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Henry Morse was born to protestant parents in Suffolk, England, in 1595, and left his home to study law in London where he learned of the Catholic Faith and converted at the age of 23. Henry traveled to Rome where he was ordained a priest.

He made his way back home to England, where he was immediately arrested and imprisoned at York with a fellow priest, a Jesuit. The three years of his imprisonment became for the young ordained priest an intense novitiate, and by the time he was released, he had made his final vows as a Jesuit.

Upon his release from prison, Henry was banished from England, but returned in 1633 under a false name. During the plague of 1636, Henry would travel to the homes of Catholics and Protestants alike, caring for the sick. He caught the plague from his patients three times, but miraculously recovered each time.

The people of England were so touched by Henry’s zeal and goodness, over 100 people converted to Catholicism in less than a year.

He was then betrayed by a friend, arrested by the authorities and again banished from England. Instead, he traveled to Southern England and ministered to the people there. Then, in 1645, Henry was arrested for the last time and sent to London for execution.

After celebrating a final Mass, Fr. Henry Morse proclaimed his faith to the crowd, prayed aloud for himself and for his executioners and was executed. “I am come hither to die for my religion.” He said to the crowd, “…I pray that my death may be some kind of atonement for the sins of this kingdom.”

Then, striking his breast three times, he gave a signal to a priest hidden in the crowd to give him absolution and said:  “Into your hands, O Lord, I commend my spirit.”

Henry Morse was canonized as a martyr in 1970.

 


 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for November 13, 2019

Men do not fear a powerful hostile army as the powers of hel...

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November 13

 

Men do not fear a powerful hostile army
as much as the powers of hell fear the name and protection of Mary.

St. Bonaventure


DEFEND Our Lady's HONOR !

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Frances Xavier Cabrini

“No, Monsignor, not that. The Pope sent me here, and here...

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St. Frances Xavier Cabrini

Born on July 15, 1850 into a family of Italian farmers near Lombardi, Frances was the youngest of thirteen children. Her parents, Augustine and Stella Cabrini, died in 1870 when she was eighteen, and Frances lived with her sister, Rosa. Though she was always a devout child, Frances became truly close to God as she grew older, and she became renowned for her holiness.

Around the year 1874, Frances was invited by her parish priest to assist at the House of Providence, an orphanage where she remained for six years. In 1877, she and seven of her close friends took their first vows. That same year, the Bishop asked her to found the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart to care for poor children in schools and hospitals. She and her seven followers organized themselves at an old Franciscan friary at Codogno, and there Frances wrote a rule for the sisters to follow. By 1887, the process for the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart to become officially recognized by the Church had begun, and houses were founded all over Italy.

In 1889, Pope Leo XIII asked Frances to travel to New York with six of her sisters to work among the Italian immigrants. When she arrived on March 31, she discovered the plan had fallen through: there was no building in which to teach, no orphanage and no home for the hard-traveled nuns to stay. Archbishop Corrigan apologized and suggested the nuns return to Italy, to which Frances replied, “No, Monsignor, not that. The Pope sent me here, and here I must stay,” and within a few weeks, she made progress with her mission, ultimately establishing schools, hospitals, and orphanages.

In 1892, Frances completed her most well-known achievement: the Columbus Hospital in New York. This success led to houses and schools being opened in Brazil, Chile and Europe. By 1907, the Missionary Sisters of the Sacred Heart were officially recognized by the Catholic Church. Their small community had grown to over a thousand, and free schools, orphanages and convents had been established in eight countries.

Her body had been failing for six years, but Frances’s death came suddenly. She died in the convent in Chicago on December 22, 1917. She was canonized in 1946.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Centuries ago, in Toledo, Spain, there lived a Cistercian nu...

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A Favor Granted

Centuries ago, in Toledo, Spain, there lived a Cistercian nun called Mary. Being at the point of death, the Blessed Mother appeared to her, and Mary said to her:

"Oh Lady, the favor you do me of visiting me at this hour emboldens me to ask you another favor, namely, that I may die at the same hour that you died and entered into heaven.”

"Yes," answered Mary Most Holy. "I will satisfy your request; you will die at that hour, and you will hear the songs and praises with which the blessed accompanied my entrance into heaven; and now prepare for your death."

When she had said this she disappeared.

Passing by Mary’s cell, other nuns heard her talking to herself, and they thought she must be losing her mind. But she related to them the vision of the Virgin Mary and the promised grace. Soon the entire convent awaited the desired hour.

When Mary knew the hour had arrived, by the striking of the clock, she said:

"Behold, the predicted hour has come; I hear the music of the angels. At this hour my queen ascended into heaven. Rest in peace, for I am going now to see her."

Saying this she expired, while her eyes became bright as stars, and her face glowed with a beautiful color.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

Centuries ago, in Toledo, Spain, there lived a Cistercian nun called Mary. Being at the point of death, the Blessed Mother appeared to her,

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