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 Header-Child of the Sixties gives gun protesters food for thought

 

Dear young protester,

Watching your protests against gun violence helps me recall my own youth.

As a child of the Sixties, I was born of a generation that also had protests. I recall my desires to change the world and make it a better place by challenging everything. I remember my frustration in the face of a world in chaos.

Now I am of the older generation, and you are on the streets. However, matters are much worse. I hope these words might warn against the repetition of a tragic mistake.



A Well-Worn Path

It was my generation that helped unleash the violence that you find in your schools, culture and lives. My generation produced your generation. You are following in our footsteps. You are the later phase of a process my generation began. Don’t continue on this path.

It was my generation that redefined freedom as “doing your own thing.” We overturned society norms, morals and manners in an attempt to achieve this freedom. However, this quest only made us a self-centered “Me Generation,” demanding everything instantly regardless of the consequences. It filled us with resentments when the world failed to bend to our needs.

Today, many of the younger generations are taking our mistake to new extremes. Today, it is no longer “doing your own thing,” but “being your own thing” since you can identify as whatever you perceive yourself to be. Anything can be the cause of resentment, triggering instant snowflake meltdowns. Tragically “being your own thing” today can now include acting out fantasies…or killing others.

 

Smashing the Restraints of Violence

violent protestersIt was my generation that looked for a world of peace and “free” peace. To obtain this goal, we destroyed family structures, sexual morals and marriage. We tried to make love free, and it came at the high price of shattering families and destroying individual lives (including those not yet born).

Far from producing love and peace, this shattered world is engendering bitter fruits in a society that is coming apart with great violence. You can see this in the sexual harassment scandals. It is found in the political landscape that is polarized and fragmented. It finds tragic expression in the lives of lonely individuals who seek revenge upon society by killing other students.

We have violence in society because our culture is immersed in it. Once my generation adopted an anything-goes attitude toward culture, it unleashed the forces of violent films, pornography, frenetic substance abuse and video games that you now see and suffer. You are given false role models that glorify this violence and make it glamorous and popular.

Your generation feels threatened by violence because we have no defense against it. We have torn down the structures of family, community and faith that once protected us from it. We have smashed the rules that restrained violence and kept society safe. We have excluded God, the source of all good and order, from the popular culture.

 

Time for a Return to Order

No guns in our schoolsAnd so as youth nationwide gather to demand action against gun violence, I would ask you to consider the cause of this violence, not only its tragic consequences. Let’s both reject the premises that brought us here.

Now is not the time to repeat the Sixties, but to reject them. Let us join together to declare the Sixties over. They have brought us a catastrophe, full of violence and politically correct intolerance. People are tired of its old rhetoric and superficiality that has led us to our broken times. They yearn for order.

Now is the time for a return to order — but not the false materialistic order of the fifties.

It is time to find our roots and go back to what Russel Kirk called those “permanent things,” those calm norms of courage, duty, courtesy, justice, and charity that owe their existence and authority not to a self-centered “Me Generation,” but to a loving and transcendent God.

Just something to think about.

All the best,

A Baby Boomer Looking to the Future

P.S. Please excuse the long explanation. I had no time to reduce the above considerations into a single tweet.

 


 

John Horvat IIBy John Horvat II

As seen on The Stream

 

 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for August 5, 2021

To the servant of God … every place is the right place and...

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August 5

 

To the servant of God
… every place is the right place,
and every time is the right time.

St. Catherine of Siena


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

Dedication of the Basilica of Saint Mary Major

Built over the place where a miraculous snow fell in the mid...

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Dedication of the Basilica of Saint Mary Major

Santa Maria Maggiore or St. Mary Major is the largest church in the world honoring the Virgin Mary and was erected in the immediate aftermath of the Council of Ephesus of 431, which proclaimed Mary Mother of God.
Standing atop one of Rome’s seven hills, the Esquiline, it is also called Santa Maria ad Nives, or "at the snow." It is said that the Mother of God chose this location for a church dedicated in her honor by a miraculous snow that fell upon this spot in summer. Legend has it a rich and pious Roman senator and his wife thought of donating their money and properties to the Church. That night, in August of 358, Our Lady appeared in the dreams of the senator and Pope Liberius asking them to build her a basilica in the exact place where snow would fall that night. Since then, Our Lady has been venerated in Italy as “Our Lady of the Snow.”

The basilica is also home to a few remnants of the humble crib in which Christ was laid at His birth. These pieces of the manger were carried to Rome by Christians fleeing the Muslim conquest of the Holy Land in the 7th century. They are preserved in a silver reliquary resembling an ordinary manger, upon which lies an image of the Infant Jesus. The Holy Crib is the object of particular devotion and veneration during the liturgical ceremonies of Christmas Eve and Midnight Mass. On Christmas morning there is a procession in honor of the Holy Crib of the Infant Jesus, which culminates in the exposition of the sacred relic on the high altar.

Another venerable treasure of Santa Maria Maggiore is the icon of Our Lady under the invocation of  "Salus Populi Romani," literally translated as "health (or salvation) of the Roman people." According to tradition, this image of Mary embracing Jesus as a young boy was the work of the evangelist St. Luke, who painted it on a tabletop made by Our Lord himself in St. Joseph's carpentry shop. This miraculous icon has been carried in processions around Rome on many occasions. In 593 the newly-elected Pope St. Gregory the Great had the icon carried in public procession through the streets of Rome praying for an end to the Black Plague. Pope St. Pius V followed his example in 1571 to pray for victory during the Battle of Lepanto, as did Pope Gregory XVI in 1837 to pray for the end of the cholera epidemic.

Second Photo by: Fczarnowski

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

In the days of yore, when travel must be had on foot or by h...

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The Virgin Mary Rewards a Bandit

In the days of yore, when travel must be had on foot or by horse, many were the dangers to be found along the roadways. Bandits plagued travelers and made their living by depriving others of their goods and often their very lives.

A young woman in the Papal States, who was very devout towards Mary, met in a certain place a chief of the bandits. Fearing some outrage, she implored him, for love of the most holy Virgin, not to molest her.

"Do not fear," he answered, "for you have prayed me in the name of the mother of God; and I only ask you to recommend me to her." Moved by the woman’s mention of the Blessed Virgin, the bandit accompanied her himself along the road to a place of safety.

The following night, Mary appeared in a dream to the bandit. She thanked him for the act of kindness he had performed for love of her. Mary went on to say that she would remember it and would one day reward him.

The robber, at length, was arrested, and condemned to death. But behold, the night previous to his execution, the blessed Virgin visited him again in a dream, and first asked him: "Do you know who I am?"

He answered, "It seems to me I have seen you before."

"I am the Virgin Mary," she continued, "and I have come to reward you for what you have done for me. You will die tomorrow, but you will die with so much contrition that you will come at once to paradise."

The convict awoke, and felt such contrition for his sins that he began to weep bitterly, all the while giving thanks aloud to our Blessed Lady. He asked immediately for a priest, to whom he made his confession with many tears, relating the vision he had seen. Finally, he asked the priest to make public this grace that had been bestowed on him by Mary.

He went joyfully to his execution, after which, as it is related, his countenance was so peaceful and so happy that all who saw him believed that the promise of the heavenly mother had been fulfilled.

From the Glories of Mary, by St. Alphonsus Maria de Liguori.

In the days of yore, when travel must be had on foot or by horse, many were the dangers to be found along the roadways.