Facebook Twitter Pinterest Youtube Instagram Give

Fatima Custodian Ben Broussard

 

The fourth of eight children, Ben was born in Louisiana, and has been a Fatima Custodian since 2013. Ben was happy to share what inspired him in the apostolate of spreading the Fatima message, as well as some of his experience in this mission.

 

Q - Why have you decided to devote your life to this mission?

Mr. Broussard - Since learning about the moral crisis in America, I wanted to do something concrete to fight against that crisis. Several years ago, I made the consecration to Mary Most Holy. I later learned about the work of the Fatima Custodians. The apostolate of bringing Our Lady into every home to promote the Fatima message seemed like a simple, yet effective, solution for helping to address our country's many problems.

 

What effect/graces/challenges/etc. have you personally witnessed at these visits? 

Mr. Broussard - Though there have been challenges, they are far outweighed by Our Lady's great generosity. It is humbling to see the great devotion so many Americans have for Our Lady, no matter their backgrounds or ages. There have been times when it seems what we're doing has very little effect. Yet Our Lady is never far behind with words of encouragement in the way of news of a man returning to the sacraments, or a family committing to praying the Rosary daily, or any number of small graces received because of a visit. We will only hear of a tiny amount of the good effects of our visits, but I’m confident that Our Lady is continually blessing us all.

 

Q - Relate your favorite or most touching Fatima Home Visit story.

Mr. Broussard -  In October 2014, I had the honor of bringing Our Lady to the home of a family from Bangladesh living in Maryland. The hostess crowned the Queen of Heaven as everyone sang a hymn to welcome her. The presentation progressed as normal, and to conclude, I witnessed the rosary prayed in Bangla for the first time. Amid an impressive array of food, the hostess took time to introduce me to everyone, in particular to her elderly mother. She told me that since coming to the United States, this strong matriarch has made sure that everyone in the family, from the oldest to the youngest, prays the rosary every day. The family still continues to meet each evening to pray the rosary and a collection of other prayers. The beloved grandmother always makes sure her grandchildren are living the Catholic faith, and is quick with a stern word for one or a word of encouragement to another. As the family shared a meal, the influence of this devout woman was evident in how close-knit they all were. Though she does not speak English, someone translated my words of praise for her hard work in keeping her family together. She smiled and conveyed her thanks for bringing Our Lady into their home. The visit showed the impressive work one person can do to give living proof that the family that prays together stays together.

 

Q - Please offer any other comments that would be helpful to readers.

Mr. Broussard - None of the work of the Fatima Custodians would be possible without your support and prayers. Our Lady has many children she wants to visit. I'm just one of the custodians who get her there. Let’s win the United States for Mary Most Holy, one home at a time!

 


 

 Fatima Home Visit Banner

 

 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for February 20, 2020

He loves, He hopes, He waits. If He came down on our altars...

read link

February 20

 

He loves, He hopes, He waits.
If He came down on our altars on certain days only,
some sinner, on being moved to repentance, might have
to look for Him, and not finding Him, might have to wait.
Our Lord prefers to wait Himself for the sinner
for years
rather than keep him waiting one instant.

St. Peter Julian Eymard

  
My Mother, I will stand with you on OCTOBER 10, 2020

Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Wulfric of Haselbury

Upon his death, a scuffle erupted in and around the church t...

read link

St. Wulfric of Haselbury

Wulfric was born south of Bristol in Compton Martin. Assigned to a parish in Deverill near Warminster after his priestly ordination, he avidly continued some of his more worldly pursuits. Hunting – with both hawks and hounds – had been a passion with him and he was loath to give either of them up until a chance conversation with a beggar. Converted to more godly pursuits by the words of the poor man, Wulfric moved back to his native village, now as its parish priest.

In 1125, desiring to live as an anchorite, Wulfric withdrew to a cell adjacent to the Church of St. Michael and All the Angels in Haselbury Plunett, Somerset. He had failed to obtain his bishop’s permission to do so, but was supported by the Cluniac monks at Montacute and others, who shared a great respect for his holiness.

His cell stood on the cold northern side of the church. In these simple quarters, Wulfric lived alone for twenty-nine years, devoting his time to prayer, meditation, the study of the Scriptures and severe bodily mortifications: he slept little, ate frugally, abstained from meat, exposed his emaciated body to extreme temperatures and wore a hair shirt and heavy chain mail tunic.

People soon sought him out for his blessing and then for his guidance and counsel. He came to be known as a healer of body, mind and spirit; miracles and prophesies followed. From his humble abode, the saintly anchorite came to exercise a powerful influence even at court. To King Henry I he predicted his imminent death; his successor, King Stephen, he chastised for the evils of his government.

Wulfric was one of the most influential anchorite priests of medieval England. Upon his death on February 20, 1154, a scuffle erupted in and around the church that had sheltered him in its shadows for nearly three decades. The Cluniac monks of Montacute maintained that since they had provided food for the holy man for many years, this gave them a claim to the hermit’s mortal remains while the pastor of Haselbury, the town’s inhabitants and their neighbors from Crewkerne, forcibly retained their possession of the same. Wulfric was buried in his own cell by the Bishop of Bath who had come to visit him shortly before his death.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Handing him a Rosary she asked him to go to Mass for a week....

read link

Payback

At Anna’s mother’s funeral a man came up to her and after offering his deepest sympathy, took the grieving daughter aside, “I must tell you a story about your good mother and something she did for me…”

He proceeded to recount how, many years before he was involved in an extra-marital affair. One day, when dining with the woman in a restaurant, Anna’s parents had come in and pretended they had not seen them.

But next day he picked up the phone to hear Anna’s mother inviting him over for a piece of pie.

“You know how good your mother’s pie was…But there was also a tone of urgent authority in her voice, so I went.”

After enjoying his piece of pie, Anna’s mother revealed that she had, indeed, seen him and his girl-friend the night before.

“Though I vehemently denied it, your mother would not relent...She proceeded to remind me of the time when I was out of work and she had cooked for my family day in and day out.”

“Now, I want payback,” she demanded.

“I reached for my wallet, but she said,”

“Not that way.”

Handing him a Rosary she asked him to go to Mass for a week. She instructed him to say the Hail Mary and Our Father assigned to each bead while thinking of something good about his wife, his children and their family life.

“If at the end of this week you still think this woman is better for you, just mail me back the Rosary, and I will never say a word about this again.”

At this point, the man telling the story reached into his pocket. Pulling out a worn Rosary, he said,

“This is the Rosary your mother gave me all those years ago. My wife and I have said it together every day since.”

 Based on a story from 101 Inspirational Stories of the Rosary by Sister Patricia Proctor, OSC

Handing him a Rosary she asked him to go to Mass for a week. She instructed him to say the Hail Mary

Let’s keep in touch!