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On January 2, the Church honors Sts. Basil the Great and Gregory Nazianzen, two friends who were pillars of orthodoxy during a period of chaos and confusion, namely the time in which the Church faced the far-reaching heresy of Arianism, which denied the divinity of Christ – an ordeal the Church has never forgotten. These two friends steered the barc of St. Peter safely through the dangerous and stormy seas of heresy.

 

St. Basil was born in Caesarea in Cappadocia – today, southeastern Turkey – in the year 329 A.D. He was born into a family of saints: his grandfather died a martyr in the Roman persecution, and his grandmother, mother, sister and two brothers are all canonized saints.

Basil was becoming famous as a teacher when he decided to leave the world. He lived for a while as a hermit then founded what was probably the first monastery in Asia Minor.  His monastic principles have influenced Eastern monasticism to this day. He was a gifted orator, and his writings place him among the great teachers of the Church.

In 370 he was made Bishop of Caesarea. He opposed the Emperor Valens when the latter pressured him to remain silent and admit heretics to Holy Communion. In the end, the Emperor backed down.

When the great St. Athanasius of Alexandria died in 373, the mantle of defender of the Faith against Arianism fell to Basil. He was misunderstood, misinterpreted, and falsely accused of ambition and heresy.

Seventy-two years after his death, the Council of Chalcedon, in recognition of his great sanctity and his heroic defense of the Faith during his life, called him “the great Basil, minister of grace who has expounded the truth to the whole earth.” He died on January 1, 379.

 

St. Gregory Nazianzen was born in 330 and received baptism at the age of thirty. For a while he joined St. Basil as a hermit, and was later ordained to the priesthood.

Consecrated Bishop of Constantinople in 381, he presided over the Second Ecumenical Council of Constantinople which defined the Nicene Creed, and which is recited every Sunday throughout the Catholic Church.

With St. Basil, he valiantly opposed Arianism and rebuilt the Faith in Constantinople at the cost of much personal persecution.

He is famous for his sermons on the Holy Trinity. St. Gregory’s last days were spent in austerity and solitude. He died on January 25, in the year 389 or 390.

 


 

 

 

 

Quote of the day

DAILY QUOTE for November 29, 2020

Problems do not go away. They must be worked through or else...

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November 29

 

Problems do not go away.
They must be worked through or else they
remain
forever a barrier to the growth and
development of the spirit.


Dr. Scott Peck M.D.


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Saint of the day

SAINT OF THE DAY

St. Radbod of Utrecht

The last pagan king of the Frisians was noted for saying tha...

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St. Radbod of Utrecht

The last pagan king of the Frisians was noted for saying that he preferred to be in Hell with his ancestors than in Heaven without them. However, his great-grandson and namesake became a saint.

Under the tutelage of his maternal uncle, Gunther, Bishop of Cologne, the young Radbod often wrote hymns and poems about the saints. In the year 900 he wrote: “I, Radbod, a sinner, have been taken, though unworthy, into the company of ministers of the church of Utrecht; with whom I pray that I may attain to eternal life.

Before the year was out, he was chosen bishop of that church. As the church of Utrecht had been founded by priests of a monastic order, Radhod made his profession as a monk before being consecrated its bishop.

From the time of his consecration the new bishop never ate meat, often fasted as long as three days and was renowned and loved for his kindness to the poor.

During a Danish invasion, Radhod moved his episcopal see from Utrecht to Denventer, and there died in peace in the year 918.

Weekly Story

WEEKLY STORY

Whoever recites this prayer fifteen times a day from the fea...

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A Christmas Prayer

(It is piously believed that whoever recites the below prayer fifteen times a day from the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle (Patron of Scotland; 30th Nov.) until Christmas will obtain what is asked.)

America Needs Fatima also believes it's pleasing and efficacious any time of the year.

Click the image to download it.

 

Whoever recites this prayer fifteen times a day from the feast of St. Andrew the Apostle (30th Nov.) until Christmas will obtain what is asked.

 

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