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1.   Never use the "H" words

2.   Decorate your lawn and home

3.   Send Christmas cards

4.   Share a Christmas meditation

5.   Organize a Public Square Nativity Scene

6.   Plan a Eucharistic adoration

7.   Visit the sick

8.   Prepare yourself

9.   Write Christmas cards to our troops

10. Don’t let secularists purge Christmas from the Public Square

 


 

  

1. Never use the “H” words:

Never say “Happy Holidays.”  The secular term means nothing and only serves to erase the memory of Christ from Christmas and the Holy Season we celebrate.

Avoid “X-Mas” too.  Wherever you go, wish others Merry Christmas: at the supermarket, on the phone, in emails.  You’ll be surprised.  Many will appreciate your conviction.

Warning: A few may not appreciate it.  Don’t let it bother you.  Say a prayer for them.

 

2. Decorate your lawn and home: 

Hang beautiful Christmas ornaments from your doors and windows.  Pick up some large poster board and markers at the bookstore and make signs that read, for example, “Just Say Merry Christmas!”  Write with big clear letters.  Tape one sign to your window facing out for everyone to see.  Place another on your door.  Encourage your friends to do the same.

 

3. Send Christmas cards:

Send a Christmas card with a religious message to your friends. Mention that you will pray for them. You can also send a card to your town mayor or elected representative. Also, look for an opportunity to write a letter to the editor of your local newspaper about Christmas. Letters receive avid and wide readership. Try it.

 

4. Share a Christmas meditation:

The message is ready to go. Just download and print this inspiring reflection (To download, you need Adobe Reader, available for free here.)

Click here for: A Christmas Meditation by the Holy Crib

Give the flyer to your friends and family.  Include it in your Christmas cards.  Post it on bulletin boards or wherever people will read it.  Share it far and wide.

OR click here for online Christmas Meditations!

 

Free Meditation Booklet Banner

 

5. Organize a Public Square Nativity Scene:

Set up a Nativity scene in your town square or in a visible public place.  Invite your friends to help.  Be creative.  Sing traditional Christmas carols like Silent Night.  Pray the Joyful mysteries of the Rosary as a group.  Meet for refreshments afterwards.  Talk about the meaning of Christmas.  Keep it simple.

For legal help in case you face opposition, please contact the Alliance Defending Freedom. They are quick and effective free help. 
Phone: 1-800-TELL-ADF.  Fax: 480-444-0025.  Website: www.alliancedefendingfreedom.org

 

6. Plan a Eucharistic adoration:

Find an Adoration Chapel near you, ask your friends to join you for a holy hour before Our Lord in the Blessed Sacrament in honor of Christmas. Mark your calendar for a convenient time. Evenings are best. After your holy hour, go out for dinner, or get a good cup of coffee or hot cider and have a discussion about the significance of Christmas.  

 

7. Visit the sick:

Those suffering in hospitals and nursing homes faintly remember the joy of Christmas. Illness, pain and loneliness overwhelm them.  It is a work of mercy to visit the sick.  You can bring them Christmas cheer.  Your local nursing home likely welcomes visitors.  Take something to give away; for example, Miraculous Medals.  Everyone likes them.  To order Miraculous Medals, call 1-888-317-5571.

 

8. Prepare yourself:

Advent prepares us to celebrate the Birth of Our Lord worthily.  We should erect a throne in our souls to receive the King of kings.  For that reason, it is an excellent time to make a good Confession before Christmas and make sacrifices.  For example, give up watching TV or surfing the Internet.

 

Free Rosary Guide Booklet Banner

 

 

 

9. Write Christmas cards to our troops:

Thank them for their sacrifice and service.  Show them your support.  Wish the troops a blessed Christmas and tell them you will remember them in your prayers or thoughts during Midnight Mass.  Remind them people back home appreciate the military.  Click here to send your Christmas cards to the troops. 

 

10. Don’t let secularists purge Christmas from the Public Square:

Christmas is vehemently opposed by secularist groups such as the ACLU, Freedom From Religion, and Americans United For Separation of Church and State.  If these pressure groups had their way, nativity scenes, Christian Christmas carols, and religious symbols would be swept from the public square.

So we Catholics should take the initiative and set up Nativity Scenes on public property all across America. The Supreme Court has decided that we have this right.

Matt Staver, Founder and Chairman of Liberty Counsel, explains:

“In contrast to a publicly sponsored nativity scene on public property, a privately sponsored nativity scene on public property does not need a secular symbol to be constitutional. For example, some towns allow private citizens to put up signs or displays on public property. In that case, if a church sponsors a nativity scene on public property, there is no requirement that a secular symbol be placed within the context. The requirement of the secular symbol only arises when a nativity scene is sponsored by the government. To avoid any confusion, the privately sponsored nativity scene should probably have a sign acknowledging the private sponsorship.”

 


 

 

 

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DAILY QUOTE for April 26, 2018

Two things are required in order to obtain eternal life: the...

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April 26

 

Two things are required
in order to obtain eternal life:
the grace of God and man’s will.
And although God made man without man’s help,
He does not sanctify him without his cooperation.

St. Thomas Aquinas


Madonna and Child  DUNKED IN URINE?  STOP!

SAINT OF THE DAY

Mother of Good Counsel

The two soldiers followed the image over land and across the...

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Mother of Good Counsel

In the quaint medieval town of Genazzano, about 30 miles from Rome, on a side altar of the Church of Our Lady of Good Counsel, there is a small image of the Blessed Virgin holding her infant Son. The Child, in His turn, lovingly encircles Mary's neck with His arm, inclining her head towards Himself in a gentle and intimate embrace.

This small fresco has a marvelous history.

In the fifteenth century there lived in the town an elderly widow, by name Petruccia, who had invested the entirety of the small fortune left to her by her husband in a needed side chapel for her church. Her money running out when the walls were only a few feet high, the townsfolk openly mocked and ridiculed her for her foolishness. Undaunted, Petruccia assured them that in spite of the apparent failure of her own endeavors, the Mother of God and St. Augustine, whose spiritual sons were caretakers of the church, would finish the work she had begun.

On April 25, 1467 as the inhabitants of Genazzano celebrated the feast of their patron St. Mark, marvelous music was heard approaching, its source seemingly from above. Looking upwards, the astounded citizens saw a brilliant cloud descending towards them. The bell of the church, and then others throughout the town, began to peel of their own accord. The cloud came to rest on Petruccia’s unfinished chapel wall and gradually dissipated, revealing the extraordinary image of the Madonna and Child. The widow's supernatural confidence being so wonderfully rewarded before the astonished gaze of all, the construction of the chapel was not long in its completion.

Shortly after these remarkable events, two foreigners in strange attire arrived in Genazzano claiming to be Albanians. Their names were Giorgio and DeSclavis and on seeing the icon, they cried out with joy and then told a wonderful tale.

After the death of Albania's king, George Castriota, known as Scanderberg, their nation had finally been conquered by the invading Turks. Early in 1467, while they prayed before the miraculous fresco, the image suddenly became illuminated, and detaching itself from the wall, it began to move through the air. Entranced, the two former soldiers followed the painting, first over land and, then, across the Adriatic Sea, which solidified under their feet.

In the Eternal City they lost sight of it, until hearing reports of a great miracle in a nearby town, they surmised where their Madonna had come to rest. Both decided to remain near their treasure, and married and raised families in Genazzano.

A plaque left at the shrine by visiting Albanians begs their Madonna to return to them, but there she is to this day. It is a continuous miracle: a fresco painted on eggshell plaster suspended in the air for five and a half centuries, but how much greater is the miracle of that tender embrace between Mother and Child, that union of soul into which each one is invited and warmly received.

WEEKLY STORY

The Miraculous Christ de la Vega

In the dead silence that ensued, all present heard a voice c...

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The Miraculous Christ de la Vega

There was once in the city of Toledo, Spain a soldier, Diego Martinez, and a young woman, Ines de Vargas, who were in love.

Diego was called to fight in Flanders, so, at Ines’ insistence, before a crucifix known as The Christ de la Vega, Diego solemnly swore to marry her on his return.

With Diego gone, Ines felt lost and alone, and often sought solace at the foot of the Christ who had witnessed their solemn engagement.

Years went by, Ines always on the lookout. One day, at the head of a returning cavalry, she beheld her fiancé. She screamed and rushed to meet him, but he feigned not to know her, and passed on.

Successful in war and prowess, he had not only been promoted to captain, but had been knighted by the King, and no longer considered Ines a worthy prospect.

Tears being of no avail, the spurned young woman took her case before the governor of Toledo, Don Pedro Ruiz de Alarcon, claiming that Diego Martinez had sworn to marry her. But the captain denied such a vow, and with no witnesses, the case was about to be dismissed when Ines cried:

“Indeed, there was a witness–the Christ the la Vega!”

There was a stunned silence. But, this was Catholic Spain, and finally, judge, Diego, Ines, court and the curious repaired to the Basilica of St. Leocadia* , which housed the carved Christ.

Kneeling between Diego and Ines before the life-sized crucifix, Don Pedro held up a Bible and asked if He, Jesus Christ, Sovereign Lord, would indeed swear to the couple’s solemn vow to wed each other.

In the dead silence that ensued, all present heard a voice coming from the statue,

“I SWEAR.”

At the same time, to the astonishment of all, the statue’s right arm, descended, its hand coming to rest on the Bible which the judge held up.

So struck were Diego and Ines, that giving up all earthly plans, they entered religious life.

As to the Christ de la Vega, to this day, His right arm remains in the same position, and, some affirm, His mouth slightly open in the utterance of His witness.

By A.F. Phillips

*Now the Ermita del Cristo de la Vega

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In the dead silence that ensued, all present heard a voice coming from the statue,

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